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Guidelines to Authors

 
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National Journal of Technology

Scope of Journal

The National Journal of Technology is a quarterly publication of high-quality papers that advance the state-of-the-art and practical applications of various engineering and technology fields. Both theoretical research contributions and applications are published.

National Journal of Technology invites and encourages the submission of manuscripts for possible publication in the journal. To subscribe the Journal please contact,  cld.ece@psgtech.ac.in

Paper Organization Guidelines

All papers should be written in English. It is essential that each manuscript be accompanied by a 75 to 200 word abstract that clearly outlines the scope and contributions of the paper. Introductory discussion should be kept at a minimum and material published elsewhere should be referenced rather than reproduced or paraphrased. Authors should strive for maximum clarity of expression, bearing in mind that the purpose of publication is dissemination of technical knowledge and that an excessively complex or poorly written presentation would obscure the significance of the work described. Care should also be taken in organizing the results such that contributions of the work, as well as a logical, consistent progression of thought are evident. It is strongly suggested that material which is not essential to the continuity of the text (e.g., proofs, derivations, or calculations) be placed in Appendices.

Review format:

An approximate guideline for the paper size in normal formatting is that the paper should be no longer than 20 single sided pages with double-spaced, 12pt font Time New Roman text.

Note:

In two-column formatting, submitted papers should not exceed 10 pages in length using 10 point font (including title, abstract, all figures, tables and references). We are strictly enforcing a length limit on submissions.

Papers meeting these guidelines are likely to experience shorter review cycles. Submitted manuscripts exceeding these guidelines will be returned to the authors for revision before being reviewed. (If in doubt about the appropriateness of the length of your manuscript please check with the Editor-in-Chief.) 

All papers submitted should be within the scope of the journal.

GENERAL MANUSCRIPT PREPARATION

Consecutive Numbering of Parts 

All manuscript pages, footnotes, equations, and references should be labeled in consecutive numerical order. Illustrations and tables should be cited in text in numerical order.

Manuscript Formats

Full length papers generally consist of the title, byline, author affiliation, footnote (including any financial support acknowledgment), index terms, abstract, nomenclature if present, introduction, body, conclusions, reference list, list of figures and table captions, and original figures and tables for reproduction. A paper may also include appendixes, a glossary of symbols, and an acknowledgment of support of any form.

Abstract

The abstract should be limited to 50-200 words and should concisely state what was done, how it was done, principal results, and their significance.

References

A numbered list of references must be provided at the end of the paper. The list should be arranged in the order of citation in text, not in alphabetical order. List only one reference per reference number. Each reference number should be enclosed by square brackets.

In text, citations of references may be given simply as "[1]". Similarly, it is not necessary to mention the authors of a reference unless the mention is relevant to the text.

Samples of various types of References are:

Books:

[1] Singiresu. S. Rao, "Engineering Optimization", third ed., New Age International (P) Limited Publishers: New Delhi, 2002.

[2] Ferdinanad P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Elliot R. Eisenberg and William E. Clausen, "Vector Mechanics for Engineers", seventh ed., vol. 1, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited: New Delhi, 2004.

Periodicals/Journal:

[3] V. V. S. K. Rao and G. Srinivasulu, "One-Dimensional Cutting Stock Problem : An Heuristic Approach", Industrial Engineering Journal, vol.34 No.10, Oct. 2005, pp. 19-22.

[4] N. Kuppuswamy and R. Rudramoorthy, "Vibration Analysis with Stiffness Modifications in the Foundation of Bulb Turbine - A Case Study", National Journal of Technology, in press. 

Conference Proceedings:

[5] P. S. S. Prasad and V. Senthil Kumaran, "Reliability Predication on Clutch Master Cylinder (CMC) using RDT", National Conference on Globally competitive Eco Friendly Technologies in Mechanical Engineering, Erode, April 15-16, 2005, pp. 52-57.

[6] Deepali Gupta and Aparna Mehra, "Small Quasi Efficiency for Vector Optimization on Banach Spaces", presented at the International Conference on Operations Research Applications in Infrastructure Development, Bangalore, 2005.

Standards/Patents:

[8] G. Brandli and M. Dick, "Alternating current fed power supply", U.S. Patent 4 084 217,
Nov. 4, 1978.

Technical Reports:

[9] E. E. Reber, R. L. Mitchell, and C. J. Carter, "Oxygen absorption in the Earth's atmosphere", 
Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA, Te

In case of Web sources, The following format is recommended.

Example:

Books:

[1] Ferdinanad P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Elliot R. Eisenberg and William E. Clausen, "Vector Mechanics for Engineers", seventh ed., vol. 1, 2004. Available: http://www.tatamcgrawhill.com/

Periodicals/Journal:

[2] N. Kuppuswamy and R. Rudramoorthy, "Vibration Analysis with Stiffness Modifications in the Foundation of Bulb Turbine - A Case Study", National Journal of Technology, vol.1 No.2, June 2005, pp. 63-67. Available: http://www.psgtech.edu/

Conference Proceedings:

[3] Deepali Gupta and Aparna Mehra, "Small Quasi Efficiency for Vector Optimization on Banach Spaces", International Conference on Operations Research Applications in Infrastructure Development, Bangalore, 2005, Available: http://www.mgmt.iisc.ernet.in/~orsibc

Figures, Tables, and Captions List

 All graphics, Figures, Tables, etc. should be included at the end of the text. The corresponding place in the text can be indicated by adding the caption "Table 1 to be included here" and likewise.

 Section Headings

Primary section headings within papers are enumerated by Roman numerals and are centered above the text. For the purpose of typing the manuscript only, primary headings should be capital letters.

          Sample:

                1. PRIMARY HEADING (TEXT)

Secondary section headings are enumerated by capital letters followed by periods ("A.", "B.", etc.) and are flush left above their sections. The first letter of each word is capitalized. In print the headings will be in italics. 

          Sample:

               1.1. Secondary Heading (TEXT)

Tertiary section headings are enumerated by Arabic numerals followed by a parenthesis. They are indented, run into the text in their sections, and are followed by a colon. The first letter of each important word is capitalized.

          Sample:

              1.1.1 Tertiary Heading: (TEXT)

Quaternary section headings are rarely necessary but are perfectly acceptable if required. They are identical to tertiary headings except that lowercase letters are used as labels and only the first letter of the heading is capitalized.

              1.1.1.1 Quaternary heading: (TEXT)

Enumeration of section headings is often desirable, but is not a requirement. If an author does choose to enumerate section headings, then ALL levels of section headings in the paper should be enumerated. Similarly, if section headings are not to be enumerated, the choice should be consistent for all headings in the paper. In either case, the remaining style rules for each level of section heading should be followed.

Units and Abbreviations:

The International System of Units (SI units) is advocated for use in. Unit symbols should be used with measured quantities, i.e., 1 mm, but not when unit names are used in text without quantities, i.e., "a few millimeters." Acronyms and abbreviations should be defined the first time they are used in text.